You’re Invited to Attend a Morning of “Stories from the Field”

The Huntsville Baha’i Community is pleased to host on Sunday August 19, 2018:

~Alicia Tyson, a PhD student examining the intersection between natural and social system resiliency and management of natural resources in Puerto Rico

and

~Amelia Tyson, a MFA candidate exploring, through film, constructive approaches to building collaborative relationships to address water resource management issues in Alabama.

JOIN US FOR A LIGHT BRUNCH AT 9:30 AM.

🍇Brunch is provided, including vegetarian, gluten free, & dairy free friendly offerings.

PROGRAM BEGINS PROMPTLY AT 10AM.

🌻Children’s activities are available.

The presentations and discussions will explore ways in which the Revelation of Baha’u’llah sheds light on the evolution of methodological approaches within two diverse professional arenas seeking to address and examine societal and community needs. As society looks to deal with ever greater challenges to its oneness, integration of the Teachings of the Bahá’í Faith to the very fabric of our daily professional and personal lives is needed like never before.

“Is not the object of every Revelation,” Bahá’u’lláh proclaims, “to effect a transformation in the whole character of mankind, a transformation that shall manifest itself, both outwardly and inwardly, that shall affect both its inner life and external conditions?”

For more information contact Rosana Tyson (rosanatyson@hotmail.com or text 256.457.4030)

Counsellors’ conversation on spiritual transformation and social change: Part 3

BAHA’I WORLD CENTRE — During a conference at the Baha’i World Centre, groups of Continental Counsellors joined in conversations that were recorded by the Baha’i World News Service for a series of podcasts on community building, spiritual transformation, and social change.

IN DEPTH: Listen to the discussion about worship and service as well as family life, community and race unity

In this podcast episode, Counsellors from Asia, the Americas, and Australasia explore the relationship between worship and service and discuss family life, community, and race unity.

Subscribe to the BWNS podcast for additional audio content

RSSiTunes

The first episode looked at spiritual and moral education programs for young people. The second highlights experiences with community schools in Africa. In this podcast episode, Counsellors explore the relationship between worship and service and discuss family life, community, and race unity.

Sokuntheary Reth speaks about the effect of an interwoven pattern of worship and service on the character of a community, drawing on the experience of the Baha’i community in Battambang, Cambodia, where a local Baha’i House of Worship was erected last year.

“After we had the Temple,” Ms. Reth explains. “We could see that people gained more understanding of prayer, about the meaning of prayer, and the power of prayer. They feel that when they come as a whole family, it helps the family to become closer to each other and much more united.”

Also, Mark Sisson from the United States and Taraz Nadarajah from Australia discuss family life, community, and race. They draw especially on experiences in Sydney, Australia, and San Diego, United States. In their conversation, they explore both how social forces are effecting society and how Baha’i communities are learning about transcending those forces to build new patterns of community life based on the oneness of humankind.

Heroine of women’s emancipation celebrated in Azerbaijan

1276_00

This scene depicts when Nasiri’d-Din Shah, the king of Persia, met with Tahirih, offering to marry her if she recanted her faith. Tahirih turned down the offer with poetry: “Kingdom, wealth, and power for thee / Beggary, exile, and loss for me / If the former be good, it’s thine / If the latter is hard, it’s mine.”

BAKU, Azerbaijan — The heroine, under the admiring gaze of the Persian king, listens to his proposal. Give up your faith, marry me, and enjoy a life of luxury as my favorite queen, was his bid.

The audience of 450 people watches this scene with bated breath.

With grace, wisdom, and courage, Tahirih declines his offer. She chooses instead to devote her life to a Cause she believes is destined to transform the world.

The performance, staged on 8 July at the Azerbaijan State Academic National Drama Theatre, was the opening of Daughter of the Sun, a new play about the life of Tahirih, an influential poet, scholar, and champion of women’s emancipation.

The opening night stirred performers and audience members alike.

“Tahirih is a hero of not only one religion but of all of humanity,” Sayman Aruz, a poet and Head of the Department of South Azerbaijan Literature in the Azerbaijan Writers Union, told the audience after the play. “She lived and died for divine and spiritual values for the whole of humanity. She has no parallel in the history of the East. She is the voice of freedom for millions.”

The play comes at a time when the life of Tahirih is gaining renewed attention and interest in Azerbaijani society.

A book on Tahirih’s life and works was translated and published in 2016, catalyzing a growing interest among the people of Azerbaijan about the life of this iconic champion of women’s emancipation. After learning about Tahirih, journalist Kamale Selim Muslimgizi was so inspired that she committed herself to producing Daughter of the Sun. Ms. Muslimgizi recruited about 30 students from a dozen universities in Baku to act in the play.

“Tahirih lived and died for the cause of truth,” Ms. Muslimgizi says. “This project changed my life. Before I had only ideas and dreams, but now I have spiritual power to make change. Tahirih gave me courage to act for the common good.”

“Tahirih is a hero of not only one religion but of all of humanity.”

– Sayman Aruz

Tahirih was born to a prominent religious family in early 19th century Qazvin, Iran. She showed great interest in matters that, at that time, were regarded as beyond the capacity of women and inappropriate for them to pursue. Despite the obstacles before her, Tahirih became a renowned poet and scholar whose influence, which was felt profoundly in her time, has not waned with the passage a century and a half.

In 1844, Tahirih became the first woman to accept the teachings of the Bab, the forerunner of Baha’u’llah, and became one of the leading figures in a movement that would spread across Persia and further afield, bringing into its ranks tens of thousands of believers in the span of a few years.

The title, “Tahirih,” was given to her by Baha’u’llah, Whom she met in 1848 at the historic Conference of Badasht. The word means “the Pure.”

It was at that important conference that Tahirih removed her veil. The act was considered unthinkable in 19th century Persia, a patriarchal society where women had little role in the public sphere. In that history-altering moment, she proclaimed that equality between women and men had been ushered in and that the teachings of the Bab signified a break from the traditions of the past — a “stunning trumpet-blast,” as described by Shoghi Effendi.

Four years later, as the Persian government undertook its brutal persecution of the Bab’s followers, Tahirih was taken into captivity in Tihran. Refusing to recant her faith, she was executed, her dying words ringing across the century that followed: “You can kill me as soon as you like, but you cannot stop the emancipation of women.”

An actor playing Tahirih’s cousin, who played an important role in connecting her to the intellectual and religious thought movements in society, speaks with two other relatives of Tahirih in a scene of the play.

An actor playing Tahirih’s cousin, who played an important role in connecting her to the intellectual and religious thought movements in society, speaks with two other relatives of Tahirih in a scene of the play.

Daughter of the Sun highlights Tahirih’s unmatched courage, a quality that has influenced generations of people. Nigar Aliyeva, the lead actor who plays Tahirih, explains:

“Tahirih said in the play, ‘I was born as Zarrin Taj but lived as Tahirih.’ While acting in the role of Tahirih I felt that I have changed. I am not a person like before. Now my life’s refrain is: ‘I was born as Nigar but will live as Tahirih.’”

In the performance, dramatization of scenes from Tahirih’s life were interspersed between segments of narration and the reading of selections from her poetry.

One audience member commented after the performance: “I now realize how courageous we should be and how we have to raise our voices against oppression and tyranny.”

Tahirih has long attracted interest among scholars. Western Orientalists of the 19th century wrote of her influence on literature and gender equality. In recent years, there have been numerous academic articles and books about her as well as translations of three volumes of her poetry into English.

Artists have also sought to depict her important influence on humanity, with playwrights, novelists, musicians, and filmmakers creating works inspired by her life and character.

Tahirih wrote in Persian, Arabic, and Azeri, a widely spoken language in Qazvin and the surrounding region. Azeri is also the main language of Azerbaijan.

The play will continue its run in Baku and in the coming months will go on stage in other cities across the country.

This brief cell phone video shows the audience’s standing ovation after the opening night of Daughter of the Sun.

 

Colombia Temple dedicated in joyful ceremony

AGUA AZUL, Colombia — Sunday’s daybreak saw more than 1,000 people gather to celebrate a historic moment as Colombia’s first Baha’i House of Worship opened its doors to all.

Gathered in the shadow of the Temple, attendees awaited their visits to the interior of the central edifice as a spirit of joy and eager anticipation filled the air. The opening of the Temple marks a new stage in the unfoldment of the Baha’i Faith in Norte del Cauca, where the Faith has had roots for more than four decades.

“We can hardly bear the great joy we feel knowing that we now have a House of Worship here,” said Carmen Rodriguez, from the nearby town of Villa Rica, reflecting on the significance of the moment.

Buses arrived shortly after dawn with people filing to a large tent where the ceremony was held. Following opening presentations, the participants walked to the central edifice for prayers.

“I believe that the House of Worship is a very important spot for not only Norte del Cauca but also the whole region,” says Hender Martínez, from the nearby town of Santander de Quilichao. “The atmosphere inside the Temple is something totally unique. You feel tranquility and peace.”

Many attendees had participated in the early discussions about the design of the Temple during the months following its announcement in 2012 by the Universal House of Justice. “I was in those early community meetings about the creation of the House of Worship. Each person was able to contribute ideas and concepts for the design. Now, we can see the outcome of this process,” described Carlos Ever Mesur from the nearby village of Mingo.

People walk past the Temple’s ancillary buildings for their visit to the interior of the central edifice. The group was led by Carmen Elisa de Sadeghian, the representative of the Universal House of Justice to the gathering (Front row, right).

People walk past the Temple’s ancillary buildings for their visit to the interior of the central edifice. The group was led by Carmen Elisa de Sadeghian, the representative of the Universal House of Justice to the gathering (Front row, right).

Sunday’s opening included remarks from the representative of the Universal House of Justice, Mrs. Carmen Elisa de Sadeghian, local dignitaries, and the Temple’s architect. Mrs. de Sadeghian read a letter of the House of Justice addressed to the attendees. “This House of Worship stands now as a symbol of the beauty inherent in the noble people of this region and its design evokes the generosity of their land,” states the letter, dated 22 July 2018.

“This historical moment today is not the end of a process,” said Mr. Gustavo Correa, a former member of the Universal House of Justice who spoke at the opening. “It is a very significant step in an enterprise that aims to bring material and spiritual prosperity to a whole region.”

Ms. Jenny Nair Gómez, the mayor of Villa Rica, also addressed the audience in an uplifting talk that recalled the first time that her office was approached about the idea of a House of Worship. “We are very honored to have this House of Worship in Norte del Cauca,” she exclaimed. She was one of four mayors that attended the event.

In his talk about the history of the Faith in the region, former member of the Universal House of Justice Dr. Farzam Arbab said: “As we contemplate today after almost half a century of continuous progress, some words that characterize the peoples of the region and their aspirations come to mind: an enormous spiritual receptivity; a keen spiritual perception; a sincere respect for intellectual achievements; an immense capacity for joy and pain which embrace one another; an unpretentious kindness and generosity of heart; untamed determination; and a brilliance of spirit which the winds of oppression cannot extinguish.”

Music and traditional dancing was featured as a central part of the opening and captured the spirit of the event.

“The House of Worship: an emblem of our history, a symbol of progress for the entire region,” sang a musical group as dancers performed. The piece, titled “The Soul of Norte del Cauca,” is about the arrival of the Baha’i Faith to the region and how Baha’u’llah’s teachings are given expression in the hopes and aspirations of the people. The group also performed a song called “La Cumbia del Jardinero.”

Following the opening program, Mrs. de Sadeghian led the first of five groups to a devotional program inside the House of Worship. The program consisted of prayers and quotations from the Baha’i writings, some of which were sung by a choir. Each group remained afterward for a period of silent prayer before making way for the next set of inauguration participants.

The event Sunday marks the opening of a month-long inauguration period. In a series of weekly visits to the Temple, 1,500 people are expected to participate in a special program called “My First Visit to the Baha’i House of Worship.” The program will include many of the features of Sunday’s dedication ceremony, allowing many more people to participate in the historic opening of the Temple.

The dedication of the House of Worship in Colombia follows the opening of another local Temple in Cambodia in September and precedes the opening of five more Baha’i Houses of Worship. Temples in India, KenyaVanuatu, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Papua New Guinea are anticipated to open in the coming years.

The day before the opening, the Colombia Baha’i community held a press conference with local journalists to discuss the occasion and its significance to the community.

 

Volunteers from nearby communities helped prepare the site for the Sunday ceremony, landscaping the Temple’s surroundings and cleaning the interior of the central edifice.

 

Counsellors’ conversation on spiritual transformation and social change: Part 2

A group of Counsellors from Africa recently discussed the work of selected Baha’i-inspired organizations in the field of education. (From left) Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, Maina Mkandawire, Judicaël Mokolé, and Alain Pierre Djoulde explained how the organizations draw on certain principles from Baha’u’llah’s teachings to inform their approach to development.
A group of Counsellors from Africa recently discussed the work of selected Baha’i-inspired organizations in the field of education. (From left) Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, Maina Mkandawire, Judicaël Mokolé, and Alain Pierre Djoulde explained how the organizations draw on certain principles from Baha’u’llah’s teachings to inform their approach to development.

 

BAHA’I WORLD CENTRE — Senior officers of the Baha’i Faith, members of the Continental Boards of Counsellors, recently met for a conference at the Baha’i World Centre following the 12th International Baha’i Convention to reflect on major developments in Baha’i communities around the world.

IN DEPTH: Listen to learn more about Baha’i-inspired endeavors in education

In this edition of the Baha’i World News Service podcast, a group of African Counsellors reflect on the experience of Baha’i-inspired organizations by discussing some educational endeavors.

Subscribe to the BWNS podcast for additional audio content

RSSiTunes

During their recent conference, groups of Counsellors joined in conversations that were captured by the Baha’i World News Service for a series of podcasts on community building, spiritual transformation, and social change.

In this episode, Alain Pierre Djoulde, Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, Maina Mkandawire, and Judicaël Mokolé – all members of the Continental Board of Counsellors in Africa – discuss selected Baha’i-inspired endeavors in the field of education.

Their conversation is informed by the experience of several Baha’i-inspired organizations involved with education and highlights certain principles drawn from Baha’u’llah’s teachings that help inform their approach to development.

“Fundamentally, we start from the assumption that each human being has been endowed with the potential to contribute to their own transformation and the transformation of their society,” explains Mr. Djoulde, who follows the work of Emergence Foundation in Cameroon. “And each people, each community has been endowed with all the capacities that allow it to develop. So, the role of [our educational program] is to help individuals to become more conscious of the potential that God has given them, and how they can use that potential for the well-being of their community.”

Mr. Feizouré, who works with Ahdieh Foundation, a Baha’i-inspired organization that promotes community schools in the Central African Republic, adds: “Our approach to development consists above all in developing the capacity of the local population itself to take charge of the education of its children.”

Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, a member of the Board of Counsellors in Africa, works with Ahdieh Foundation, a Baha’i-inspired organization that promotes community schools in the Central African Republic.

Clément Thyrrell Feizouré, a member of the Board of Counsellors in Africa, works with Ahdieh Foundation, a Baha’i-inspired organization that promotes community schools in the Central African Republic.

“The approach that we take is completely in the field. It involves us having conversations with the local population about education – about intellectual, spiritual, and moral education. Then the community itself decides to construct its own school, and our role is mostly to help the community develop its capacity by training teachers and accompanying the process of education that is put into place,” he continues.

Mrs. Mkandawire works with a similar initiative, Bambino Foundation, in Malawi. Speaking of the experience there, she says: “With community schools, the community takes responsibility of the education that their children are involved in. The teachers are from the community itself, and they are very dedicated. The community can see the transformation in the children because there is now a unified purpose for both the parents and the teachers to make sure that the children’s education goes well. So, we find that there is a lot of involvement and commitment from the parents to make sure that their children are learning. In most cases, these schools are run by the community itself. The families pay a little just to support the teacher. And the teachers don’t get much, but it’s the service to their community, to their village, that motivates them to teach so that they see some change for the better.”

The organizations that support community schools focus on providing teacher training and improving the quality of education as the school expands. Their experience has shown that premature introduction of funds to an endeavor can create challenges that may lead to dependency on outside support or disunity. Such educational institutions emerge where the spirit of worship and service is pronounced; in these places there is also a heightened consciousness of collective responsibility to the advancement of their community.

Mr. Mokolé, who also works with Ahdieh Foundation in Central African Republic, explains that the experience of this Baha’i-inspired organization with community schools has generated insights that have been useful to the government in its work to provide education throughout the country: “It allowed the government to see a possible way to overcome the question of finances that was the limiting factor in supporting teachers at community schools – an approach focused on raising consciousness and changing the mentality of the parents so that they can themselves take charge of supporting the teachers that are educating their children.”

 

 

Colombia Temple nears completion as dome is adorned with sacred symbol

AGUA AZUL, Colombia — The sacred Baha’i symbol known as the Greatest Name was raised to the apex of the dome inside the local Baha’i House of Worship in Agua Azul, Colombia, on Friday.

A small gathering, including representatives of the Baha’i community, witnessed this significant moment, marking the near-completion of the world’s second local House of Worship. Following the recitation of prayers, the carved teak Greatest Name symbol was raised 15 meters to be placed at the inner apex of the dome.

The Greatest Name is a calligraphic representation of the invocation “O Glory of the All-Glorious.” A version of the symbol is placed in every Baha’i Temple. The Temple’s crowning piece, which rises 18 meters, represents the blooming cocoa flower, an iconic symbol in Colombia.

Carpenters from the firm that carved the Greatest Name symbol prepare it to be raised to the apex of the dome of the local House of Worship in Agua Azul, Colombia.

Carpenters from the firm that carved the Greatest Name symbol prepare it to be raised to the apex of the dome of the local House of Worship in Agua Azul, Colombia.

In the coming weeks, an ornamental silver case filled with dust from the inner sanctuary of the Shrine of the Bab will be placed within the Temple. Also, a carpet that had been placed in the Shrine will be displayed in the Temple’s reception building. These acts will represent the profound connection between this local House of Worship and the spiritual center of the Baha’i Faith.

This Temple is one of the five local Baha’i Houses of Worship whose construction was announced by the Universal House of Justice in 2012. Following the inauguration ceremony next month, the Temple will open to the public.

Learning about education: the experience of Ahdieh Foundation

 

Mr. Clément Feizouré (left), Director of Ahdieh Foundation, visits a class at a community school in Bangui.
Mr. Clément Feizouré (left), Director of Ahdieh Foundation, visits a class at a community school in Bangui.

 

BANGUI, Central African Republic — In the Central African Republic a Baha’i-inspired organization is learning about fostering the emergence of schools from the grassroots, sustained by the local communities themselves.

Ahdieh Foundation focuses on efforts to promote community schools, providing teacher training and other support to these community initiatives.

The foundation’s experience sheds light on the capacity and initiative of the people of the Central African Republic, which stands in contrast to the political instability and sectarian violence that are major features of the country’s global image.

“Ahdieh Foundation is part of a network of Baha’i-inspired organizations in Africa that are striving to see how to promote education at the grassroots and how to build capacity in communities to take charge of the education of the younger generation,” explains Nakhjavan Tanyi, the Continental Programme Coordinator for this network.

Like other Baha’i-inspired organizations, Ahdieh Foundation views its work as a process of learning about applying the Baha’i teachings and knowledge accumulated in various fields of human endeavour to the progress of society.

“The work of many Baha’i-inspired organizations focuses a lot on the community level. The long-term vision is how to help a community address all dimensions of its development. Usually it starts with one small effort or one particular dimension, in this case education,” says Mr. Tanyi.

A teacher conducts a lesson at a community school in Bangui.
A teacher conducts a lesson at a community school in Bangui.

 

Since its establishment in 2003, Ahdieh Foundation is gaining insights about the role of the teacher, the parents, and the school in a community. These insights, along with principles drawn from the Baha’i writings, shape the way teacher training is approached, how teachers are accompanied, and the functioning of each school in relation to the community.

“Many communities used to think that only teachers have knowledge to educate the children and that as a parent, you bring your child to school, leave the teachers to impart their knowledge and do not get involved,” says Mr. Judicaël Mokole, one of the staff at Ahdieh Foundation.

“Community schools are changing this idea,” he continues. “Parents and community members start seeing the school as an entity through which they can think and reflect and contribute to the education of their children.”

The approach taken by Ahdieh Foundation to starting schools seems to be central to fostering this sense of ownership.

“The organization will start a conversation with communities about what they themselves can do to be able to educate their own children,” Mr. Tanyi says. “Where members of a community, and its leaders, show a willingness to participate in that effort, then the idea is introduced of them being able to start a school that would grow organically over time that would start with a preschool. Then, depending not only on the availability of human resources in that community, but also the willingness of the community to continue, that school can grow and add a grade each year.”

“It’s best to start with the simplest thing and then build capacity over time for more complex things,” Mr. Tanyi explains.

The teachers, Mr. Tanyi says, are identified by the community itself.

“The idea is not to get someone from outside. It’s to get someone from within the community, who knows the community, who is familiar with its people, who knows its reality,” Mr. Tanyi explains. “What we see in this individual who arises to start teaching is not just a teacher whose work is limited to a classroom, but someone who can become an agent of change in a community.”

Drawing on the latent capacity of a community allows the schools to operate in a region that has experienced ongoing civil conflict since 2012.

“These community schools were the only schools that continued functioning in many parts of the country during the civil unrest,” states Mr. Mokole. “This was partly because the teachers of the community schools were local to the area. The community they served in was their home. They had nowhere to run to when the rebels came.”

“The content of the teacher’s training also helps them conceive of their work as service. It’s not merely a job they are doing to get money. They are teachers because they are motivated by a desire to prepare the younger generation for the future,” he continues.

The teachers also receive a small stipend, funded by parents and community members, for school supplies and personal expenses, Mr. Mokole explains. “And it will always be like this. Our experience has been that if you come with a salary sourced externally and pay the teacher in this way, from the top down, in the community there is something that is lost, that does not feel right, and the community school slowly crumbles,” he adds.

“What we see in this individual who arises to start teaching is not just a teacher whose work is limited to a classroom, but someone who can become an agent of change in a community.”

– Nakhjavan Tanyi

Similarly, Mr. Mokole says that when the initiative and resources come primarily from outside, or when the focus is on just providing a school building, communities do not have a sense of responsibility and investment in the school.

“It’s not uncommon to see schools built by outside organizations being used to house sheep and goats, or where people are using the desks and chairs in these buildings for cooking. From this you can see the value of the process starting from within the community, by the villagers themselves,” states Mr. Mokole.

The community members show such love for the simple structures they have built for their schools with their own hands, using materials such as straw, mud or wood, Mr. Mokole adds.

From time to time, as schools grow, there may be needs for which the resources available to the community are not sufficient, Mr. Tanyi says. “There will sometimes be needs for funds to come from outside. But we try to think very carefully about at what point we do that. We try to wait until the point when the community has really taken ownership of the project,” he notes.

“By no means are we saying that this is the solution to education at the grassroots,” clarifies Mr. Tanyi, “but we are very hopeful that this approach could help us really think about how to raise people in the community that can be protagonists of change and can spearhead development processes in their community.”

At present, 150 people who have participated in Ahdieh Foundation’s training program are providing education to nearly 4,000 students in 40 community schools, 10 of which offer the complete primary cycle, from kindergarten to grade six.