Register NOW! National Race Amity Centenary Celebration Conference

The Baha’i Faith National Race Amity Centenary Celebration Conference is right around the corner friends! This conference celebrates 100 years since the first Race Amity Convention, commissioned by Abdul-Baha. As such, on ​May 21-23, 2021, ​we celebrate how far we have come in these endeavors, recognizing the efforts of so many in carrying out this work, but we also acknowledge the perseverance required of us as we continue addressing “the most vital and challenging issue” facing America in our time. 

https://raceamityconference.org/
Early Bird Registration Now Open!

Bahai.org: International website sees major redesign on 25th year since launch

BAHÁ’Í WORLD CENTRE — The newly redesigned website of the worldwide Bahá’í community at www.bahai.org has launched, representing the latest in a series of developments since the site was first created in 1996.

The extensive revamp provides an enhanced visual experience and additional features that aim to make the site’s some 140 articles more easily accessible.

Updates to the site include a new section titled “Featured Videos” that brings together a curated selection of content drawn from the Bahai.org family of websites.
Updates to the site include a new section titled “Featured Videos” that brings together a curated selection of content drawn from the Bahai.org family of websites.

Updates to the site include two new sections—“Featured Articles” and “Featured Videos”—that bring together a curated selection of content drawn from the Bahai.org family of websites and new videos on the Bahá’í community’s involvement in the life of society, its efforts to promote the social and material well-being of people of all walks of life, and the integration of service and worship in Bahá’í community life.

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Some 140 articles on the website are arranged in collections on a wide range of topics in two main sections—“What Bahá’ís Believe” and “What Bahá’ís Do.”

The new version of the site opens the way for further additions planned for the coming months and years, which will explore the development of the global Bahá’í community and the experience of those throughout the world who, inspired by the teachings of Bahá’u’lláh, are striving to contribute to the betterment of society.

The Cause of Universal Peace

‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s Enduring Impact

The article below by Kathryn Jewett Hogenson has been added to the special collection, “The Mystery of God,” a selection of pieces brought together to honor the Centenary of the passing of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, the eldest son of Bahá’u’lláh, the Prophet-Founder of the Baha’i Faith. You can also visit the Library to see the entire selection of essays and articles on the website.  The Library is periodically augmented with pieces from the printed volumes, published from 1926 to 2006. 

In the late summer of 1911 in the United States, Albert Smiley found a letter sent from Egypt among the items in his mail. Dated August 9, it was from ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, head of a religion which Smiley had only briefly encountered the year before.1 The letter addressed Smiley as the founder and host of the Lake Mohonk Conferences on International Arbitration and praised those gatherings and their goal of establishing arbitration as the means to settle disputes between nations. ‘Abdu’l-Bahá stated emphatically, “What cause is greater than this!” Explaining how His Father, Bahá’u’lláh, had advocated the unity of the nations and religions, He asserted that the basis of this unity was the oneness of humanity.2 To ensure that His message to the sponsors was received and considered, a second letter was sent on August 22 to the Conference secretary, Mr. C. C. Philips. It began, “The Conference on International Arbitration and Peace is the greatest results [sic] of this great age.”3 In response, the organizers invited ‘Abdu’l-Bahá to take part in the 1912 Conference and to address one of its sessions.4

To continue reading, go here.

Farmers, agricultural scientists, policy makers address Iran’s Chief Justice and Minister of Agriculture

SYDNEY — Farmers as well as agricultural scientists and policy makers from Australia, Africa and North America have joined the global outcry at the unjust confiscation of lands belonging to Bahá’í farmers in Iran, as the Iranian authorities face mounting criticism over the widespread and systematic persecution of the country’s Bahá’ís.

In an open letter to Iran’s Chief Justice Ebrahim Raisi and acting Minister of Agriculture Abbas Keshavarz, figures in the field of agriculture from several countries across the world—including Canada, Ethiopia, Mali, and the United States—say they are speaking out because they “are concerned about the plight of smallholder farmers throughout the world who often face injustice from arbitrary authority.

In an open letter to Iran’s Chief Justice Ebrahim Raisi and acting Minister of Agriculture Abbas Keshavarz, figures in the field of agriculture from several countries across the world—including Canada, Ethiopia, Mali, and the United States—say they are speaking out because they “are concerned about the plight of smallholder farmers throughout the world who often face injustice from arbitrary authority.

“These recent land seizures take place within the context of escalating raids on Bahá’í owned homes and businesses in Iran,” they say, expressing their alarm at the latest stage in the ongoing persecution of the Bahá’ís of Ivel who have been displaced and economically impoverished by Iranian authorities solely because of their religious beliefs.

The open letter states: “We understand that Bahá’í families have farmed land in Ivel for over 150 years and that these families have been constructive members of the local community, by, for instance, starting a school for children of all faiths and by carrying out measures to improve the hygiene and health of all community members.

“Despite their contributions to the community,” the letter continues, “they have faced a series of persecutions throughout the years, characterized by mass expulsion and displacement, and the demolition, bulldozing and confiscation of their homes.”

The signatories call on Chief Justice Raisi and Minister of Agriculture Keshavarz to end the persecution of Bahá’ís, saying, “We write as fellow agriculturists to bring attention to this instance of persecution and urge the Iranian authorities to overturn their decision with regard to the farmers of Ivel.”https://www.youtube.com/embed/QzR1tCXgtqo?controls=0A moving video message released on behalf of members of Australia’s farming community draws attention to the plight of Bahá’í families in the Iranian village of Ivel. Claire Booth, a farmer from New South Wales, speaks in the video.

Meanwhile in Australia, a moving video message released on behalf of members of the country’s farming community draws attention to the plight of Bahá’í families in the Iranian village of Ivel.

“Farming is a difficult job at the best of times,” says Claire Booth, a farmer from New South Wales, in the video message. “It’s not made any easier by the frequency of floods, droughts, fires, climate change, and most recently, the impacts of the pandemic.”

The video message describes the role of a supportive government in assisting its farming communities, drawing a sharp contrast with Iran’s harsh treatment of the country’s “peaceful Bahá’í community.”

“We stand in solidarity with our farming brothers and sisters in this country,” the farmers say, “and call on the Iranian government and judiciary to return the land and properties to their rightful owners—Bahá’í farmers in Ivel.”

Ground broken for first local Bahá’í temple in India

HARGAWAN, India — Ground was broken this week for the first local Bahá’í House of Worship in India—an edifice from which will emanate the spirit of worship and service that has been fostered over decades in the local area, known as Bihar Sharif. The groundbreaking ceremony marked the start of the construction of this edifice, which is among the seven Bahá’í temples announced in 2012.

The ceremony brought together local dignitaries, representatives of the Bahá’í community, and residents of the area. The occasion began with prayers and deep prajwalan—the Indian custom of lighting a lamp to signify the attainment of knowledge, purity, and connection with the divine. Children and youth played a special role in the program, contributing to the devotional atmosphere through songs and musical drama.

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The groundbreaking ceremony marking the start of construction of the local House of Worship in Bihar Sharif, India, brought together local dignitaries, representatives of the Bahá’í community and residents of the area.

In his comments at the ceremony, Amod Kumar, the head of the Panchayat (a local civic body) of Hargawan, Bihar Sharif, spoke about his hopes for the temple. “Today our society is divided by caste, religion, and generation. The Bahá’í teachings have contributed to unifying people here, especially children and young people participating in the Bahá’í community’s moral education programs. Now this area has received the House of Worship as a divine gift, and it is hoped that the community here will benefit from this gift and continue to achieve progress and prosperity.”

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Amritha Ballal, one of the founding partners of SpaceMatters, the architecture firm that designed the House of Worship, speaks at the groundbreaking ceremony.

Naznene Rowhani, Secretary of the Bahá’í National Spiritual Assembly of India said, “Unity and harmony in our diverse society has been expressed through India’s proud Vedic tradition of vasudhaiva kutumbakam—the world is one family. … [The temple] will be a shining symbol of vasudhaiva kutumbakam in action—where everybody, regardless of community, caste, color, or creed will be welcome to commune with their Creator. This tradition is affirmed and manifested in Bahá’u’lláh’s words ‘Regard ye not one other as strangers. Ye are the fruits of one tree and the leaves of one branch. So powerful is the light of unity that it can illuminate the whole earth.’”

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Children and youth played a special role in the program, contributing to the devotional atmosphere through songs and musical drama.

The groundbreaking ceremony culminated with the placing of soil collected from villages across the state of Bihar at the temple site. This gesture was evocative of the connection between the thousands of residents of these villages and the House of Worship.

“When hundreds of people—young and old, women and men, farmers, laborers, students, doctors, businessmen—eventually gather together daily in the House of Worship and turn to the Almighty, this will further strengthen the bonds of unity that have formed in this community,” said Rahul Kumar, a member of the Continental Board of Counsellors in Asia.

A scale model of the design for the temple and surrounding facilities was presented at the groundbreaking.
A scale model of the design for the temple and surrounding facilities was presented at the groundbreaking.

In her remarks at the ceremony, Ms. Rowhani explained how the Temple will belong to all people of Bihar Sharif. “It is the fervent hope of the Bahá’í community of India that this beautiful edifice will be a place where humanity will enter and find harmony, peace, and spirituality.”

The groundbreaking comes after the unveiling of the design for the House of Worship, which took place last April.

“An extraordinary wave of support”: Calls in unison for Iran to end persecution of Bahá’ís

BIC GENEVA — Leading Muslims, government officials, and parliamentarians around the world have joined a growing outcry at the unjust confiscation of properties owned by Bahá’ís in the Iranian farming village of Ivel. The ruling to allow Iranian authorities to confiscate the properties, clearly motivated by religious prejudice, was recently upheld in an appeals court and has left dozens of families internally displaced and economically impoverished.

The American Islamic Congress, the Canadian Council of Imams, Chair of the Virtues Ethics Foundation and one of the leading Islamic scholars in the United Kingdom Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra, the All India Tanzeem Falahul Muslemin, and the All India Saifi Association have all issued statements in support of the Bahá’ís in Ivel, expressing grave concern about the confiscation of the properties.

“We are calling for the Higher court in Mazandaran and all responsible personnel to take action and to help the Baha’i community in Ivel get back their properties,” reads the statement from the American Islamic Congress. Echoing these sentiments, the Canadian Council of Imams writes, “We are deeply concerned by the ruling issued by an Iranian Court to confiscate the properties of 27 Bahá’ís in the farming village of Ivel.”

A statement of the Canadian Council of Imams in support of the Bahá’ís in Ivel.
statement of the Canadian Council of Imams in support of the Bahá’ís in Ivel.

Shaykh Ibrahim Mogra from the United Kingdom called on Iran’s Chief Justice, Ebrahim Raisi, “to address this injustice,” adding that “Islam does not permit a government to confiscate land from citizens just because they follow a different religion.”

Diane Ala’i, Representative of the Bahá’í International Community (BIC) to the United Nations in Geneva, says, “The sight of Muslim leaders around the world coming to the aid of their Bahá’í friends in Iran in an extraordinary wave of support is a powerful signal to the Islamic Republic that their co-religionists around the world condemn their actions.

“Statements of support from leading Muslims for the Bahá’ís in Ivel, who have lived there for more than 150 years with their Muslim neighbors, show that the Iranian government’s invocation of Islamic law is a thin veil covering its persecution of the Bahá’ís.”

A message posted on Twitter by Canadian Foreign Minister Marc Garneau.
A message posted on Twitter by Canadian Foreign Minister Marc Garneau.

In a further sign of international support for the Bahá’ís in Iran, government officials around the world have condemned the Iranian court decision. The Canadian Foreign Minister, Marc Garneau, says his government is “concerned” by the ruling, urging Iran to “eliminate all forms of discrimination based on religion or belief.” The call has been echoed by officials in GermanyNetherlandsSwedenUnited KingdomBrazil, the United Statesthe European Parliament and the United Nations.

A message posted on Twitter by Jos Douma, the Netherlands’ Special Envoy for Religion or Belief.
A message posted on Twitter by Jos Douma, the Netherlands’ Special Envoy for Religion or Belief.

In Sweden, 12 members of parliament and other elected representatives have strongly called on Iran to return the lands of the Bahá’ís of Ivel. The German Federal Government Commissioner for Global Freedom of Religion, Markus Grübel, also called for Iran to recognize the Bahá’ís as a religious community in the country and to end the “discrimination and persecution of Bahá’í communities.”

South Africa’s Legal Resources Centre, an organization known for its human rights work during apartheid, has also issued a letter condemning the property confiscations.

SLIDESHOW
A ruling to allow Iranian authorities to confiscate properties belonging to Bahá’ís in the village of Ivel, clearly motivated by religious prejudice, was recently upheld in an appeals court and has left dozens of families internally displaced and economically impoverished.

“The world is watching and is appalled by the Iranian government’s blatant injustices towards the Bahá’í community,” says Ms. Ala’i of the BIC. “The innocence of the Bahá’ís is more evident than ever to the international community and Iran is being held accountable for the gross injustices it has inflicted on the Bahá’í community in Iran. The government must take the necessary steps to not only return the lands to the Bahá’ís in Ivel but to end the systematic persecution of the Bahá’ís throughout the entire country once and for all.”

The history of land confiscation and mass displacement of Bahá’ís in Iran is detailed in a special section of the website of the Canadian Bahá’í community’s Office of Public Affairs.

2020 in review: A year without precedent

BAHÁ’Í WORLD CENTRE — The Bahá’í World News Service looks back on a year like no other, providing an overview of the stories it has covered on developments in the global Bahá’í community that have strengthened resilience and offered hope in a time of great need.https://player.vimeo.com/video/495839889Developments in the global Bahá’í community in 2020

Responding to the pandemic

When the pandemic first hit, acts of solidarity throughout the world showed humanity how it could rally around an issue to alleviate suffering. The months since March have demonstrated more clearly than ever that every human being can become a protagonist of change. As people took action, a sense of collective purpose motivated yet more people to do whatever they could to be of service to their fellow citizens—creating a virtuous circle and giving rise to an unprecedented level of collective action.

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Youth in Sierra Leone have created a film that helps educate their community about preventing the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).

In March, the News Service reported on the initial response of Bahá’í communities to the crisis as they quickly and creatively adapted to new forms of interaction suited to public health requirements and found ways to be of service to their societies.

In a suburb of New York City, a group of youth engaged in Bahá’í community-building efforts turned their attention to pressing needs arising from school closures.

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Left: Children in Berlin, Germany, who participate in Baha’i education classes, have made drawings on the theme of hope for the residents of a home for the elderly. Right: Children in New Zealand painting at home.

Children in Luxembourg participating in moral education classes made cards to bring joy to health workers and others carrying out essential services, while children in Berlin, Germany, created drawings on the theme of hope for the residents of a home for the elderly. In Slovenia, the Bahá’ís of Bašelj connected food delivery services catering to restaurants to also deliver to homes. That month also saw Bahá’ís around the world marking Naw-Rúz—their new year and the first day of spring—by strengthening bonds of friendship and conveying messages of hope.

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Bahá’í communities in New Zealand are offering moral education classes online for children.

By April, as the spread of the coronavirus had become more apparent, the efforts of Bahá’í communities further intensified. In Canada, participants of a Bahá’í-inspired program for English learners found support in one another through difficult times. In Tunisia, the Bahá’ís of the country joined with diverse religious groups to call for both science and religion to guide an effective response. In the DRC, community ties enabled thousands of people to be kept informed of accurate information and advice, including on what crops to plant to ensure food security. In Kiyunga, Uganda, radio broadcasts prompted conversations across households on the importance of prayer as a source of strength. Bahá’í radio stations elsewhere found a renewed purpose, acting as a source of critical information and an anchor of community life to those living in rural areas.

To respond to the great need for personal protective equipment, Local Spiritual Assemblies in India have been collaborating with tailors to make and distribute face masks.
To respond to the great need for personal protective equipment, Local Spiritual Assemblies in India have been collaborating with tailors to make and distribute face masks.

Efforts that month swelled where Bahá’í Local and National Spiritual Assemblies channeled the energy and assistance of very many people into action, disseminated critical information and other resources to where it was most needed, and assisted vulnerable populations to access government services.

In the months since April, it has become ever more clear that service to society and collective worship are essential elements in the life of a community that remains hopeful and perseveres in the face of a crisis. In Romania, participants in devotional gatherings open to all are finding their hearts to be “beating as one”. In South Africa, Bahá’í healthcare professionals, seeing potential in every human being to serve their society, have been drawing on the strength of the community to provide support to those recovering from the coronavirus.

In all places, youth have moved to the forefront of the grassroots response to the crisis. In Sierra Leone, young people created a film on preventive health measures, while in Italy youth explored profound themes related to social transformation in a series of short videos. Amid the pandemic and in the aftermath of the Beirut explosion, youth in the city drew on capacities they had gained in Bahá’í community-building efforts to create a disaster recovery network.

Over this period, the arts have played an important role in casting a light on themes that are captivating the public consciousness. Meanwhile, the Bahá’í World publication has released a series of articles on themes related to the global health crisis and major issues facing societies as they look ahead.

Pursuing long-term social and economic development endeavors

In addition to reporting on grassroots Bahá’í social and economic initiatives in response to the pandemic, the News Service also covered more complex projects and efforts by Bahá’í-inspired organizations as they adapted to circumstances arising from the health crisis.

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Participants in a Bahá’í-inspired educational program called Preparation for Social Action in Vanuatu are taking steps to maintain food supplies for their fellow citizens.

The News Service reported on examples of initiatives to improve food security. In Vanuatu, participants in a Bahá’í-inspired educational program called Preparation for Social Action have been taking steps to not only maintain food supplies for their fellow citizens, but also to encourage others in their country to do the same. In Nepal, with many migrant workers returning home amid the pandemic, a Baha’i Local Spiritual Assembly took steps to enhance the community’s capacity to produce its own food.

In Colombia, FUNDAEC—a Baha’i-inspired organization based in Cali—turned its attention to supporting local food production initiatives, while fostering appreciation toward the land and the environment in communities throughout the country.

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Teachers at the Riḍván School in El Salvador have been offering classes online and through other means, including at a safe distance in neighborhood streets where families have limited or no internet access.

Some of the efforts covered in the area of education include the following: In Bolivia, a Bahá’í-inspired university has been supporting staff and students through challenging times and has given thoughtful consideration to identifying technologies suitable for present circumstances. In the Central African Republic, Indonesia and India—among other places—Bahá’í-inspired community schools have found creative ways of adapting, gaining insight into the role of teachers in times of crises. In the United States, constructive conversations among individuals, officials, and the police on racial equality have helped to create shared purpose among different segments of society toward improving systems of public safety.

Participating in the discourses of society

This past year, the News Service covered a variety of stories on the efforts of the Bahá’í community to contribute to social discourses.

In September, the Bahá’í International Community released a statement titled “A Governance Befitting: Humanity and the Path Toward a Just Global Order,” marking the 75th anniversary of the United Nations.
In September, the Bahá’í International Community released a statement titled “A Governance Befitting: Humanity and the Path Toward a Just Global Order,” marking the 75th anniversary of the United Nations.

The Bahá’í International Community participated in forums on the importance of language in fostering a shared identityagriculturepeace, and the role of international structures on a path to a just global order.

National Bahá’í communities have contributed to discourses on the environmentfamily lifethe equality of women and men, and the role of religion in society.

In Jordan and other countries, Bahá’í communities have been creating spaces for journalists and different social actors to explore how the media can play a constructive role in society. In Indonesia, a series of seminars has tapped into a strong desire among officials, academics, and others to explore fundamental principles of a more peaceful society. In Canada and Austria, a podcast series and video blog respectively have been drawing insights from religion to provide new perspectives on issues of national concern. Participants of roundtable discussions in Kazakhstan and the Kurdistan region of Iraq have been exploring how spiritual principles that have drawn people together in this time can help shape public life in the future. In Chile, the Bahá’í community has been creating spaces alongside the constitutional process to examine with their fellow citizens the foundations for a materially and spiritually prosperous society.

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The Bahá’ís of Jordan have been hosting roundtable discussions with journalists on how the media can be a source of hope for society.

National conversations about peace and coexistence gained momentum over the past year. At a moment when racial and other forms of prejudice came to the forefront of public consciousness in the United States and across the world, the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá’ís of that country released a statement that spurred vital conversations about a path forward. In the Netherlands, the anniversary of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá’s Tablets to the Hague prompted reflection on progress toward world peace. In Tunisia, roundtable discussions examined how peaceful coexistence would only be possible with the full participation of women.

This year, among the conferences organized by the Bahá’í Chair for World Peace at the University of Maryland, College Park, was a gathering on the need to address moral dimensions of climate change. The Bahá’í Chair for Studies in Development at Devi Ahilya University, Indore, invited economists and academics to examine how new conceptions of human nature can enhance long-term approaches to urban development in light of the health crisis.

In Australia, a two-year process of gatherings among diverse segments of society culminated in the release of Creating an Inclusive Narrative, a publication that offers insights on forging a common identity.
In Australia, a two-year process of gatherings among diverse segments of society culminated in the release of Creating an Inclusive Narrative, a publication that offers insights on forging a common identity.

In Australia, a two-year process of gatherings among diverse segments of society culminated in the release of Creating an Inclusive Narrative, a publication that offers insights on forging a common identity. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo and India, remarkable gatherings brought together chiefs to examine how to transcend traditional barriers and prejudices that keep people apart as they build toward lasting peace.

In Papua New Guinea, the Bahá’í National Spiritual Assembly of the country issued a statement in July on the equality of women and men, speaking to a global concern that has been exacerbated during the pandemic.

The Institute for Studies in Global Prosperity has been promoting gatherings for university students in which young people explore together questions concerning social change.

Persecution of the Bahá’ís in Iran and Yemen

At a time when the international community has been battling a global health crisis, the persecution of the Bahá’ís in Iran and Yemen has not relented.

A United Nations resolution, passed earlier this month by the General Assembly, condemned Iran’s ongoing violations of human rights, including those of the country’s Bahá’í community. This year Iranian authorities have escalated their persecution of the Bahá’ís through scores of baseless arrests, denial of the most basic civil rights, and restrictions in applying for a new national identification card. These actions have placed great pressures on individuals and families already facing a health crisis.

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Six Bahá’ís in Yemen were released from years of wrongful detainment this year.

In Yemen, a court upheld a religiously-motivated death sentence against a Bahá’í earlier this year. Although he and five other Bahá’ís were later released from their wrongful detainment, the Bahá’í International Community remains gravely concerned and has called for the safeguarding of the rights of all Bahá’ís in Yemen to live according to their beliefs without risk of persecution.

Bahá’í Houses of Worship

The News Service covered stories this past year on how Bahá’í Houses of Worship have adapted to the pandemic while infusing wider segments of society with the spirit of collective worship and service. Stories also reported on advancements in the construction of Houses of Worship in Kenya and Papua New Guinea.

SLIDESHOW
Design for the dome of the House of Worship in Bihar Sharif, India.

In places where Bahá’í Houses of Worship stand, new approaches are being taken to infuse wider segments of society with the spirit these structures embody.

Design concepts were announced for the local temple in Bihar Sharif, India, and the national House of Worship for the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The project in the DRC forged ahead, with a groundbreaking ceremony and the start of construction.

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In Matunda Soy, Kenya, construction of the local House of Worship is now at an advanced stage of completion.

Construction of the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá

The beginning of this year saw the first steps being taken to prepare the site and lay the groundwork for the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá. Coinciding with the start of construction, the mayor of ‘Akká and representatives of the city’s religious communities gathered to honor ‘Abdu’l-Bahá at a special ceremony.

SLIDESHOW
Progress on the construction of the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá continued to be made with the approval of local authorities at each stage.

Although certain operations had necessarily slowed or stopped when the pandemic hit, progress continued to be made with the approval of local authorities at each stage. By April work on the foundations was giving shape to an imprint of the design’s elegant geometry. In September the foundations were completed. By November, the first vertical elements were being raised.

Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá: Structure rises above foundations

BAHÁ’Í WORLD CENTRE — Since the completion of the foundations for the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá, the first vertical elements are now being raised. The subterranean portion of the structure, which will lie beneath the circular geometry, is also beginning to take shape.

Work is advancing to lay the concrete platforms that will provide stability to the landscaping berms on either side of a central plaza.

The selection of photos below provides a view into the work currently underway.

As with the central foundations, many support piles were driven deep into the ground, and these are now being capped with a layer of reinforced concrete in several stages to create platforms for the landscaping berms.

As with the central foundations, many support piles were driven deep into the ground, and these are now being capped with a layer of reinforced concrete in several stages to create platforms for the landscaping berms.

A close up of a portion of the structure.

A close up of a portion of the structure.

The design of the Shrine incorporates two sloping berms enclosing the central plaza. An intricate trellis above the plaza connects the berms to the inner part of the structure. A concrete platform is being prepared for each berm, providing stability to the landscaping that will sit above.

The design of the Shrine incorporates two sloping berms enclosing the central plaza. An intricate trellis above the plaza connects the berms to the inner part of the structure. A concrete platform is being prepared for each berm, providing stability to the landscaping that will sit above.

“Void former” blocks are fitted together to separate the concrete platform from the soil.

“Void former” blocks are fitted together to separate the concrete platform from the soil.

Once “void former” blocks are put in place, reinforcement bars are laid for the concrete pour.

Once “void former” blocks are put in place, reinforcement bars are laid for the concrete pour.

As one segment of the platform is completed, preparation continues on the next. The construction of concrete platforms for the berms is nearing completion.

As one segment of the platform is completed, preparation continues on the next. The construction of concrete platforms for the berms is nearing completion.

Step by step, the construction of the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá continues.

Step by step, the construction of the Shrine of ‘Abdu’l-Bahá continues.

The News Service will continue to cover developments of the project through articles and brief notices, which may be viewed in a special section of the website.

Bahá’í Radio: Stations invite participation, connect people during pandemic

TALAVERA, Philippines — Radio stations operated by Bahá’í communities in several countries have found a renewed purpose during the pandemic, acting as a source of critical information and an anchor of community life when other forms of interaction have been limited.

Radyo Bahá’í in the Central Luzon region of the Philippines has played a significant role during the health crisis in creating a sense of togetherness through participatory programs dedicated to prayer and uplifting music reflective of the culture of the region. Its broadcast radius of 90 kilometers has also allowed the station to transmit crucial messages to remote areas which would otherwise be difficult to reach.

In the United States, Radio Baha’i station WLGI is operated at the Louis Gregory Baha’i Institute in Hemingway, SC.

Christine Flores, director of Radyo Bahá’í, says, “Families are spending so much more time together, and we hope to contribute to a home environment characterized by unity and cooperation. For example, prayers and songs are broadcast every hour during the day, many contributed by listeners. Praying regularly is key to upliftment and inspiration. We are spiritual beings, and it is natural for us to connect with our creator in our homes.”

SLIDESHOW
Radyo Bahá’í in the Central Luzon region of the Philippines has played a significant role during the health crisis in creating a sense of togetherness and transmitting crucial messages to remote areas within its broadcast radius of 90 kilometers.

The station is also assisting with educational needs in the region by collaborating with the country’s Department of Education. Regular broadcasts of education materials by Radyo Bahá’í reach thousands of children whose schools are closed because of public health measures. These educational broadcasts are supplemented with songs and stories inspired by the Bahá’í teachings on such themes as truthfulness, generosity, patience, and kindness.

“The radio has been an important instrument in fostering a sense of belonging and connection between people during a time of distancing,” says Mrs. Flores. “A collective spirit is needed to face this crisis. A shared identity is strengthened when people hear programs reflecting their culture in their own local language and when they are contributing to content. Normally, information and ideas are passed around as people meet each other, but now the radio station is helping fill this need in our region.”

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The public schools district supervisor during a broadcast of educational programs that reach thousands of children whose schools are closed because of public health measures.

Across the Pacific Ocean, a Bahá’í-inspired radio station in Panama has focused on inspiring acts of service and attending to practical needs during the pandemic. Listeners are given the opportunity to offer support to those living in rural areas struggling to access public services given the restrictions on movement.

Fabio Rodriguez, coordinator of the station, says, “Our programs emphasize service and the idea that all people have the right to contribute to society. The station welcomes people from the area to assist in the production of programs, who are able to convey the reality of their shared experiences and their hopes in a way that speaks to the hearts of their fellow community members. This in turn encourages more people to see themselves as active participants in shaping the life of their communities.

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Photograph taken before the current health crisis. One area of focus of Chile Bahá’í Radio has been the preservation of language and culture of the Mapuche people.

Elsewhere in Latin America, Chile Bahá’í Radio based in Labranza, Chile, has been in close dialogue with surrounding indigenous communities to ensure that programs speak to their needs and aspirations. One area of focus of the station has been the preservation of language and culture of the Mapuche people.

“The radio plays a vital role in promoting the noblest aspects of the Mapuche people, and contributes to a sense of hope and comfort in this crisis,” says the coordinator of the station, Alex Calfuquero.

“Early morning prayer is a fundamental tradition, and Mapuche prayers are often included in the station’s devotional programs, which are sometimes broadcast from the Bahá’í temple in Santiago.”

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Prayers in the indigenous Mapuche language are a part of regular broadcasts of Chile Bahá’í Radio.

Katty Scoggin, who collaborates with the radio stations in Chile and Panama, reflects on recent experiences: “These Bahá’í radio stations have been operating for years and years. They have been a part of the local culture. These initiatives are not just a one-sided broadcast service, they have a meaningful presence in the communities they serve.

“In media, there are the people who create something, and the people who consume content—usually just as recipients. We are trying to learn about something different. These radio stations assist with raising capacity for service to society and give a voice to the whole community.”

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During the health crisis, Radyo Bahá’í in the Philippines has been creating a sense of togetherness through participatory programs dedicated to prayer and uplifting music reflective of the culture of the region.

2020 Annual Celebration and Awards Conference

It’s almost time for the Interfaith Mission Service annual event and this year promises to be an exciting and inspiring evening, VIA ZOOM!

Baha’is from Huntsville and Madison attended last year’s event at UAH and were delighted by the inclusion of the Faith in the program, and the mention of the station of Baha’u’llah by the keynote speaker.

For 50 years, the member congregations, as part of the “Power of We” network, have been filling gaps in community services by developing service agencies and working to transform systemic social injustice, racial inequity, and interfaith barriers.

By lifting our eyes and looking to the future, we learned about changing trends, such as increased diversity and the accompanying push back, and hunger for spirituality. We are now focusing on the moral and ethical challenges of the coming years—The Future is NOW!  https://www.interfaithmissionservice.org/2020-ims-acac/